Acharné - Curandera Songs (EP)

It’s been quite some time since the last Acharné release - this one very much an ode to those who work with Plant Medicine, particularly the powerful female’s who’ve Ive had the honour of meeting in the last 12 months.

There’s more to say, but, perhaps…. the music is enough for now.

This release is very much close to my heart - composed over 18 months in the bowels of London…


Seppüku Records, 2019
Cat No: SPK010

Composed by Rick Bull in Hackney, London.
Mixed & mastered at Neu Music Studios, Sydney Australia.

www.facebook.com/deepchildmusic
www.facebook.com/neumusicstudios

released September 8, 2019

SWAGZ - A FREE DL...

BEYONCE GOT SWAG

So do we. Delighted to offer the very first track entirely produced, mixed and mastered in-house at Neu Music Studios.

Follow us on the gram' - we'll be forever grateful...

https://www.instagram.com/neumusicstudios/

credits

released August 14, 2019
Produced, Mixed & Mastered by Rick Bull at Neu Music Studios

NEW Deepchild music - Tricks With Knives EP

It’s been a minute, but I’m excited to present a fresh 2-tracker of bumping techno…

This duo is very much a couplet of extended locked grooves and deconstructed funk, bumping on at a tightly honed 133.33bpm…..

You know what to do! Grab it on Bandcamp NOW!

A Long Overdue Deepchild DJ Mix

In celebration of an upcoming show I'm headlining for the excellent crew from Homostash (playing at Egg London on July 7th for London's Pride Week celebrations!) here's the first dj mix I've producer in a while...

Listen closely, and you may even note a little taster from a new Deepchild EP nestled amidst the noise...*more to come on this*

1. "Acid Jackson" - Boddika
2. "Baby Wants to Ride" (Jimmy Edgar edit) - Frankie Knuckles
3. "Check It Out" - Fearz
4. "The Grid" - Martyn Bootyspoon
5. " Kordman Return (Swing Mix)" - Skee Mask
6. "First_Leyland" - Yaleesa Hall
7."Kalif Storch" - Modeselektor
8. "Dos 4" - Dance System
9. "Untitled" - Truncate
10. "Flash" - Cajmere
11. "Revolve" - Benjamin Damage
12. "Pride" - Deepchild. Pres Dj Boyfriend
13. "Whip" - Aden
14. "Thousand Plaeteaus" - Deepchild
15. "SW9 9S" - Fourtet
16. "Die Reflexion Des Projektors Auf Der Leinwand" - Krill Minima

See you there on the dancefloor...

NEW music video work, Derrida, A haunted GAZE...

"[T]he world [is] suspended by some unique tear … reflecting disappearance itself: the world, the whole world, the world itself, for death takes from us not only some particular life within the world, some moment that belongs to us, but, each time, without limit, someone through whom the world, and first of all our own world, will have opened up….”  - Jacques Derrida

---

Those who know me doubtlesly appreciate my ongoing fascination with the writings of the late Mark Fisher; one of the great champions of Jacques Derrida.

Fisher's books "Capitalist Realism - Is There No Alternative?" and "Ghosts of My Life" give eloquent shape to the sense of existential "future loss" so many of us feel, swimming in a digital culture defined by 'cultural re-treads' of once radiant fictions.

From widescreen remakes of "Wonderwoman" or "Friends", to a fascination with analogue recording technology, vintage synths (and the recreations thereof) and 'relicked' guitars, the implication persists that a new post-millenial 'authenticity' is measured by ghostly,  nostalgic signifiers, forever locked in the amber of an imagined past few actually experienced.

If "the medium is the message", what then is the message, when the medium resembles an opaque replica (plugin, filter, artificial noise-floor) of an older medium, originally designed for 'transparency'?

We are viewing 'through a glass darkly', only this time intentionally, literally.

Reflections of reflections.

Grafton Tanner's excellent "Babbling Corpse" expands further on notions of 'hauntology' examined by both Fisher and Derrida, examining musical forms like Vaporwave through this lens of the uncanny. It's vital reading, well written and engaging.

As part of of my own teaching and composition work, I've just completed the sketch below - a video response to a piece I composed as part of a previous EP, itself something of an exercise in unwitting hauntology. The video itself is composed entirely of youtube clips, most of which are digitisations of kids' toy advertisements from the 50s to 70s -  including a number for products for "mothers". I'm fascinated by the maternal gaze here, and that of the 'child' - the lines between volition and passivity which the camera imbues both with, and how these parlay with each other, dependent on product and circumstance.

You may well recognise the brief segments I've culled from the Johnson & Johnsons 'Language of Love' commercial(s) - unlikely examples of prescient hauntology in the 80s advertising cannon. We are as disconcerted by this advertisement's unanswered questions, moved by its exaggerated emotional caricature,  framed as voyeurs in an intimately uneasy emotional discourse,

In an era of rampant 'oversharing' on Facebook and Instagram, pre-internet commercials like 1987's "The Language Of Love" are eerily prescient, sitting at a hinge-point between 2nd and 3rd wave Feminism. Prototypical legitimacy via contrived confessional.

Who is this (wealthy?) young mother, so palpably alone in her ward after childbirth?
Where is her partner, family?
Why has her child been taken from her, set to be returned whilst she anxiously waits in psychic limbo?
What is this deep distress which haunts here?
What future awaits which she is so noticeably anxious about?

The dominant tone here is one of deep loneliness, and perhaps a loss of 'self' - an advertisement which speaks to a sudden erasure of one future and the giddy adrenal aftershock of a strange new kind of love.

It struck me enough to create (something of) a video response to.

"The lie is the future, one may venture to say [...]. To tell the truth is, on the contrary, to say what is or what will have been and it would instead prefer the past." - Jacques Derrida
 

Nostalgia, Transactive Memory, Gladwell & Herndon...

I recently stumbled across Malcolm Gladwell's brilliant Revisionist History Podcast, which I've been consuming voraciously on slow sojourns across London. As a social anthropologist-cum-critical theorist, I've become even more enamored since hearing his lucid reflections committed to audio format. Its' vital, pertinent listening - and a finessed exercise in discourse which directly challenges the reductionist rhetoric of the newsfeed.

Amid the incredible material on offer, one episode struck me as personally resonant, in which Gladwell touches on the idea of transactive memory, or the notion that individuals in a collective / relationship effectively act as storehouses or portals of a kind of collective memory system - at once holding and forming a more complex memory system. I'm new to the concept, but it feels fascinating to me - a notion which dovetails into my studies into 'hauntology' and nostalgia.

Here's Malcolm Gladwell speaking a little more about this....

And some further reflections on the notion of nostalgia, from Holly Herndon, who's work I find wonderfully populist in the very best of ways.

How do transactive memory systems serve to invent orthodoxies in arts practice? There's so much to unpack here - more questions than answered. Gladwell's reflections on transactive memory and Winston Churchill are fascinating..
 

Malcolm Gladwell

Malcolm Gladwell

Nostalgia can also lead into certain kinds of orthodoxy within genre, and I think that gets really dangerous. Once you create this entire rule structure of what something’s supposed to be like, that’s when I get completely bored and turn off. I’m more interested when things are mixed up and mashed up and people are able to experiment outside of orthodoxy. I’m not completely anti-nostalgia, but it’s not really a sensibility that I strongly play into. I think we can find new forms and new paradigms.
— Holly Herndon

Deepchild v The Specials "Racist Friend"

It's been a big month. After bouncing from Australia to London to Copenhagen to Berlin and back now to London, I'm soundly ensconced in the bosom of Hackney, head-down in audio production for Sample Magic and others (check out my recent Lo-Fi Techno sample pack here) and slowly acclimatizing to life in the UK, forging connections and dusting off the burnished pipes of pedagogy along the way.

Loads coming up, including a cameo at the Ableton LOOP Conference in a couple of months, as well as the usual mix of gigs, audio commissions an lecturing work around the place.

Meanwhile, I thought given the current state of world politics, I'd dig up and make available a cover version I produced of The Specials "Racist Friend", some years ago. Enjoy.

Deepchild Sound Design - Moussy Studiowear Japan

Some new Deepchild sound-design work (feat. the wonderful voice of Jessica O'Donoghue for Moussy Studiowear, Japan)....

MOUSSY STUDIOWEAR 8/25(FRI)Debut.
___________________________________________
8/25(FRI) より、ファッション性とトレンドのスポーツテイストをMIXしたMOUSSYの新たなライン
【MOUSSY STUDIOWEAR】がデビュー。

これに先がけ、スペシャルムービーをOfficial Webサイトにて公開中。
ぜひ、【MOUSSY STUDIOWEAR】の世界観をお楽しみくださいませ。
___________________________________________
STUDIOWEAR は『鏡に映る自分のための服』というコンセプトのもと
スタジオで鏡に向かい合い、日々自問自答を繰り返しながら、
自分自身の限界を常に超えて戦っている人を
応援したいという願いを込めて作られた新ラインです。

鏡の中にいる自分自身を好きになることで自分でも
気付かなかった、秘めたポテンシャルを引き出すことができる。
Fashionには、そういう力があると
MOUSSYは信じています。
『How Long? My Satisfaction』
どのくらい?自分自身が満足するまで。。。。
今回はダンサーなら誰しもが感じる心の葛藤を
ダンサーMIUさんに表現、演じて頂きました。

STUDIOWEARのグラフィックは全て反転しており、鏡の中の自分だけが正しい文字として読むことができます。

Fashionの力を全ての人へ。
#MOUSSYSTUDIOWEAR
#MOUSSY

特設サイトはこちら
http://www.moussy.ne.jp/studiowear/#news

A New Deepchild Sample Pack for Sample Magic

I've very much enjoyed working with Sample Magic for several years now - producing audio loops, Ableton Live presets and more. I'm more than excited to finally launch my most recent offering, which we've (perhaps somewhat generically) called "Lo-Fi Techno". As with most of my work, it really is an extension of my work, study and musical output. In other words, these sample packs (others of which include Analogue Techno and Analogue House are really representative of the kinds of material you'll hear on my albums as both Acharné and Deepchild.

These packs are, of course, royalty free to use - in other words, by purchasing, you are infact free to use them in your own productions without purchasing additional publishing / licensing rights.

With this in mind, I hope that for fans, students and producers alike, they add something to the collective collaborative musical experiment. Whether or not they end up on big room releases like this or this or are just fun to mess around with, I'm so excited to be able to release these into the world.

Naturally, I'd LOVE to hear from any of you making use of these tools, loops, instruments.

I love the experience of hearing how others 'hear' these micro-sketches, loops, noodles and hooks...

Lo-Fi Techno....

Lo-Fi Techno....


And here, a few tracks which have made great use of my production work in the past...

Acharné album feature in The Guardian...

My last album, "Innocence and Suburbia", has been receiving some wonderful press of late, most recently from the esteemed Kate Hennessy at The Guardian.

Having stepped away from Berlin for a while, it's been quite a change of cultural climate here in Australia, and I'm honored to know that (despite the lure of the beach, and our draconian 'lock out laws') this album has landed on willing ears. There's not much to add, here, but read on... a remarkable selection of fellow antipodeans are also mentioned...

"Rick Bull, better known as Deepchild, forge new ground with a new alias: Acharné. In “a radical pause to reflect on the shifting sands of a beloved city” Bull made a very lovely record, full of gently shifting sensibilities.

"Rick Bull, better known as Deepchild, forge new ground with a new alias: Acharné. In “a radical pause to reflect on the shifting sands of a beloved city” Bull made a very lovely record, full of gently shifting sensibilities.

FREE DL: Ariana - "Into You" (Deepchild Austerity-Free VIP) & 20+ more...

Amidst my constant posts about pedagogy, futurism, melancholia and neoliberalism, it's easy to lose sight of the gratuitous joy of pop music.

Ariana Grande has certainly become the subject of much focus of late - a bona-fide post-tween idol, placed front and centre in the light of the recent tragedy in Manchester. More power to her for her gracious response to the tragedy too.

Grande's work tends to be heavy on the saccharine teen-love side of things, underscored by some moment of simply superb songwriting... and (imho) a devastatingly great set of vocal chords.

Ariana is a legit singer.

Full credits for the original "Into You" can be found here which stands as one of my personal favorite pop sculptures of 2016...

I decided to take this on as a remix exercise to re-imagine a slightly deeper, more grown-up take on the original, which (to my ears) is a little heavy on an over-tooled EDM production aesthetic - which is somewhat tragic, as the original track and vocal arrangement is superb, classic pop-writing perfection.

I've offered my instrumental retake as an additional download here too - incase anyone would like to take it and make it their own (remix of a remix anyone?). I'd love to hear what other vocalists might bring to the table here. Take it and run with my blessing.....

Ultimately, "Into You" has always sounded like a backroom, bump-n-grind exercise in woozy love-making. It's the spirit I've tried to channel here - in all its 'austerity-free' glory.

Let's face it - the warmth of human bodies under low light with a little red-wine will liberate us in ways in which Thatcherism and it's acolytes could only dream of.

Deep respect to Ariana, and all those makin' love, bleedin' down the night, and shinin' on in dark times. Love, especially today for friends and familyin London, Manchester Berlin and across Europe.

I miss you all deeply. Play these loud - bonus points for anyone who sends through video evidence, which I'll gladly post here.


Here are 20 or so additional sketches / downloads from my Soundlcoud page, for any interested - a mixture of mastered, unmastered, work in progress and previously released works. And yes, that Alicia re-redux has well and truly clocked 100,000+ plays now. Who knew?

Mark Fisher - Neoliberalism & LOST FUTURES (Selected Articles)

Capitalist realism insists on treating mental health as if it were a natural fact, like weather (but, then again, weather is no longer a natural fact so much as a political-economic effect). In the 1960s and 1970s, radical theory and politics (Laing, Foucault, Deleuze and Guattari, etc.) coalesced around extreme mental conditions such as schizophrenia, arguing, for instance, that madness was not a natural, but a political, category. But what is needed now is a politicization of much more common disorders. Indeed, it is their very commonness which is the issue: in Britain, depression is now the condition that is most treated by the NHS.
— Mark Fisher, Capitalist Realism: Is There No Alternative?

"When I eventually got a job as lecturer in a further education college, I was for a while elated – yet by its very nature this elation showed that I had not shaken off the feelings of worthlessness that would soon lead to further periods of depression. I lacked the calm confidence of one born to the role. At some not very submerged level, I evidently still didn’t believe that I was the kind of person who could do a job like teaching. But where did this belief come from?"

"When I eventually got a job as lecturer in a further education college, I was for a while elated – yet by its very nature this elation showed that I had not shaken off the feelings of worthlessness that would soon lead to further periods of depression. I lacked the calm confidence of one born to the role. At some not very submerged level, I evidently still didn’t believe that I was the kind of person who could do a job like teaching. But where did this belief come from?"


"Where postmodernism embraced difference and plurality, parody, and complicitous critique (to use Linda Hutcheon’s phrase), it now takes for granted this challenge and itself becomes, along with modernist styles, a frozen aesthetic, an expressionless commodity decorating the background of our life world. “Capitalism,” as he so eloquently puts it, “is what is left when beliefs have collapsed at the level of ritual or symbolic elaboration, and all that is left is the consumer-spectator, trudging through the ruins and the relics.”

"Where postmodernism embraced difference and plurality, parody, and complicitous critique (to use Linda Hutcheon’s phrase), it now takes for granted this challenge and itself becomes, along with modernist styles, a frozen aesthetic, an expressionless commodity decorating the background of our life world. “Capitalism,” as he so eloquently puts it, “is what is left when beliefs have collapsed at the level of ritual or symbolic elaboration, and all that is left is the consumer-spectator, trudging through the ruins and the relics.”


"While 20th Century experimental culture was seized by a recombinatorial delirium, which made it feel as if newness was infinitely available, the 21st Century is oppressed by a crushing sense of finitude and exhaustion. It doesn’t feel like the future. Or, alternatively, it doesn’t feel as if the 21st Century has started yet. We remain trapped in the 20th century, just as Sapphire and Steel were incarcerated in their roadside café. "

"While 20th Century experimental culture was seized by a recombinatorial delirium, which made it feel as if newness was infinitely available, the 21st Century is oppressed by a crushing sense of finitude and exhaustion. It doesn’t feel like the future. Or, alternatively, it doesn’t feel as if the 21st Century has started yet. We remain trapped in the 20th century, just as Sapphire and Steel were incarcerated in their roadside café. "


"Consider the fate of the concept of ‘futuristic’ music. The ‘futuristic’ in music has long since ceased to refer to any future that we expect to be different; it has become an established style, much like a particular typographical font. Invited to think of the futuristic, we will still come up with something like the music of Kraftwerk, even though this is now as antique as Glenn Miller’s big band jazz was when the German group began experimenting with synthesizers in the early 1970s."

"Consider the fate of the concept of ‘futuristic’ music. The ‘futuristic’ in music has long since ceased to refer to any future that we expect to be different; it has become an established style, much like a particular typographical font. Invited to think of the futuristic, we will still come up with something like the music of Kraftwerk, even though this is now as antique as Glenn Miller’s big band jazz was when the German group began experimenting with synthesizers in the early 1970s."


Source: https://www.wired.com/beyond-the-beyond/20...

When The Future Stopped - a chat with Native Instruments

I recently had a wonderful chat with Native Instruments in Berlin, about.....what happened when the future stopped.... check out the full interview here and linked below....

Perhaps in some sense, it’s a sound aesthetic reacting to the tropes of ‘realism’ or ‘authenticity’, which are the byproducts of the neoliberal sound machine. I’m not interested in the sound of a ‘real 808’, or ‘old-school’ house or techno, or ‘authentic’ tape saturation. These technologies were so vital because they sprung from a time when the ‘future’ was still being invented, and so often now we look ‘back to the future’ which never came to pass.